There aren’t many animals that can generate such great fear as sharks do. If you are preparing for a fishing trip, besides preparing a good fishing reel and other useful fishing equipment, you should also do some research about the specimens you can meet in that particular area. If there is a possibility to encounter sharks, the selection shown below will show you which species are the most dangerous and why.

 

Shortfin Mako

Being a part of the mackerel shark family, which also contains notorious members such as the great white and the prehistoric megalodon, it is not much of a surprise to find the shortfin mako listed here.

An adult can grow up to 10 feet, weighing almost a ton, but there have been recordings of specimens of 15 feet. Given their size and weight, and also their incredible speed of 46 mph, they can take incredible leaps from the water.

There have been reports of Makos landing in the middle of fishing boats causing severe injuries. You should better think twice about using an inflatable boat in waters where Makos reside.

Oceanic Whitetip

This shark is not as fast as the Mako, yet it can be very aggressive and determined. Rather than avoiding a fight, they engage in taking whatever they find available, displaying a behavior that can only be compared to a frenzy.

Adult whitetip sharks can grow up to 13 feet, and they are capable killers with very powerful jaws. There have been many reports involving whitetip sharks, starting from the Second World War. Many ships sunk during that period, and these ferocious killers are believed to be the prime suspect of hundreds of deaths.

Other attack records have been registered since then, and Jacques Cousteau even referred to the Whitetip as the most dangerous of all sharks.

 

Tiger Shark

Weighing over a ton and reaching a length of over 16 feet, tiger sharks have a wider mouth than most other members of this family. This makes them one of the most dangerous and powerful shark species from the tropics, mainly around Australia and Hawaii.

The shark’s large mouth is lined with serrated teeth, which are designed to slice prey. The name comes from both the stripes running down its sides and from its aggressive temperament.

Just like in the case of terrestrial tigers, clearly, humans are no match for such brutal predators. It’s no wonder they earned the reputation of being vicious man-eaters.

Bull Shark

Many consider the Bull Shark to be the most dangerous species of sharks. An adult can grow up to 11.5 feet and weigh up to 700 lbs. The bull shark is well equipped with a few rows of triangular serrated teeth.

More than other types of sharks, this one is particularly dangerous to humans, as it can often be found in shallow coastal waters but can also tolerate fresh water with the ability to swim thousands of miles up rivers and can even live in lakes.

If you think you are safe going for a swim in a lake, think again!

 

Great White Shark

It is no surprise this species can be found on number one in any top of the most dangerous sharks in the world. Just the name would suffice to send everyone running from the beach.

The largest recorded specimens are in the range of 22 to 26 feet and can weigh nearly 3.5 tons. Their triangular and serrated teeth alone measure approximately 3 inches.

Great Whites usually hunt sea lions and seals. They do not seem to show a particular interest in humans, as we do not have enough flesh to satisfy their hunger, but an accidental meeting with this colossal fish can result in the loss of a leg or an arm, and in a worst case scenario – human life.